Kadlekalu Ganesha & Sasivekalu Ganesha Temples on Hemakuta Hill in Hampi

Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple

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Kadlekalu Ganesha & Sasivekalu Ganesha Temples on Hemakuta Hill in Hampi

As you head to the Hemakuta Hill or also called the Hemakuta Group of Temples. You experience a beautiful view of the Virupaksha Temple and the town from the northern side. So this article covers the Kadlekalu Ganesha & Sasivekalu Ganesha Temples on Hemakuta Hill in Hampi.

Hemakuta Hill or Hemakuta Group of Temples

The Hemakuta Group of Temples consists of more than 35 ancient temples that belong to both pre and the Vijayanagara periods. Some of which were said to be built in the 9th to 14th century. Most of which are dedicated to Shiva because of many mythological reasons. It is said that Shiva with his third eye burnt Kama, the God of lust on this hill. As he distracted Shiva from his penance to help Pampa marry Lord Shiva. But later Kama’s wife Rathi pleaded to Shiva for his husband and he brought him back only in character but not in a physical form.

Again they say that when Shiva decided to marry Pampa it rained gold on this hill. And it is where that this hill got its name Hema which is gold in Sanskrit.

The architecture of the temples of Hemakuta Hills are often mistaken with the Jain Temples. Due to some of the similarities of the architecture of the Vijayanagara style.

Kadlekalu Ganesha Temple

Kadlekalu Ganesha Entrance
Kadlekalu Ganesha Entrance

At the northeastern slope of the Hemakuta hill you will find this giant statue of Ganesha inside a shrine. Which has been carved out of a huge boulder about 4.5 meters (15 feet) tall monolithic statue. The belly of this statue has been chiselled in a way that resembles to a Bengal Gram known as Kadalekalu in the local language where it gets the name. Built in the 15th century the belly and snout were destroyed by the invaders in suspicion of hidden gold inside.

Kadlekalu Ganesha Statue
Kadlekalu Ganesha Statue

The statue is four armed, holding a tusk, goad, noose and a bowl of sweetmeats, respectively in each hand. The temple hall has beautiful granite pillars decorated with various mythological characters and themes carved out on them. You get a beautiful view of the surroundings like the Mathanga Hill and Hampi Bazaar from the slope where its located. Being a calm place you would love to spend some time here.

Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple

Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple
Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple

The Sasivekalu Ganesha Temple also gets its name from a local word Sasivekalu which means mustard seed. It has a funny mythological story on the notorious food habits of Ganesha that one day he ate so much food. That his tummy was almost about to burst, and to save his tummy he caught a snake and wrapped it around his tummy like a belt. Hence that unique design came into existence.

This statue too was carved out of a single boulder with a height of 8 feet. The statue is built inside an open pavilion, and the inscriptions say that this temple was built by a trader from Chandragiri (Now Andhra Pradesh) in 1506 AD. In the memory of the Vijayanagara king Narasimha II. Another interesting fact being that the other side of the statue they have carved the back of Goddess Parvathi. And is said that Ganesha is sitting on the lap of Goddess Parvathi here.

There’s really a lot more to explore after visiting these temples and knowing so much about them. You become more curious about the place to know more about the history of Hampi. So we move ahead to our next place. Coming next week so follow me everywhere.

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2 Comment

  1. Amazing post.. loved reading it.

    1. Glad you liked it 🙂 More coming soon Checkout the video on my channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F25qzNyksHg

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